Questionable contract?

If you want to volunteer for our Citizens Contract Oversight Committee, or have a tip to share, please email us at NYCschoolcontractwatch@gmail.com

Sunday, February 15, 2009

Term limits: the NY Times shows its hypocrisy

The NY Times reveals its double standard when it comes to democracy here in NYC.

Though the editors of the paper now insist that since Venezuelans "believe in their democracy" they should vote against extending term limits for their President, the paper vehemently opposed the same right for New Yorkers less than six months ago.

Indeed, Hugo Chavez has proven himself to be more of a democrat than Bloomberg, who refused to give voters the chance to decide on term limits -- a position that the Times supported. In this case, the ruling class reserved the right to keep one of its own in office -- whatever New Yorkers might prefer.

NY Times Editorial: Venezuelans' Right to Say No
Published: February 13, 2009

Hugo Chávez apparently doesn't believe Venezuelan voters, who just more than a year ago rejected his bid to eliminate the term limits that are blocking his continued rule. On Sunday, he is giving them another chance. For the sake of Venezuela's democracy, they should again vote no on changing the nation's constitution. . . . . Voters should not yield. Mr. Chávez needs to be reminded that Venezuelans believe in their democracy and cherish their right to say no.

NY Times Editorial: Term Limits and the Council
Published: October 22, 2008

The City Council is expected to vote on Thursday on Mayor Michael Bloomberg's proposal to revise New York City's term-limits law. The proposal would allow the mayor and most of the city's elected officials to run for a third four-year term. We urge the Council to approve it. . . . We are fully aware that this proposal has stirred great controversy,not least because New York City voters twice voted for term limits, in 1993 and 1996. . . . . .We agree with the mayor that the Council is best positioned to quickly settle the matter. It would be technically difficult and perhaps legally problematic to organize a meaningful citywide referendum before the 2009 elections.

thanks to Mel Meer.

No comments: